6.10.14

THE HOUSE ORGAN FOR BUSINESS AS USUAL FINALLY DISCOVERS THE UNUSUAL.

If administrators at an obscure public college serving a predominantly minority, commuter population conduct themselves like Third World despots and nobody notices, does it matter?  If bargaining organizations that officially or unofficially represent faculty object and nobody notices, did it happen?

Larry Summers got tossed at Harvard, after a faculty vote of no confidence made the news world-wide.  What you have done to the least among thee ... the Chronicle of Higher Education discovers the faculty discontent after ten years, and five years after President-for-Life Wayne Watson brought his enrollment-management skills over from the Chicago community college system.  Here's the CSU Faculty Voice reaction to the Chronicle coverage.  The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, which has sued Chicago State, comments, "One might think that CSU would have learned from its repeated failed attempts to quell internal dissent—but one would be wrong."  And University Diaries takes occasion to characterize President-for-Life Watson's rule as "North Korean style dictatorship."

I should think that as a matter of justice, administrative over-reach at Chicago State is as egregious as similar over-reach at a Delaware or a Harvard.  Otherwise, administrators at similarly obscure colleges and universities might feel safe in getting away with such stunts.  Academically vulnerable or striving or place-bound students will therefore be less-well served than their counterparts at institutions where Public Scrutiny offers a check on the over-reach.

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