25.7.11

PAYING FOR HIGH SCHOOL TWICE?  An Inside Higher Ed column proposes Five Myths of Remedial Ed.  The heart of the remediation problem, however, is buried in the conclusion.
Remedial education is the 800-pound gorilla that stands squarely in the path of our national objective to increase the number of adults with a college degree. If we dispel these myths, the solutions become clear: get higher education to articulate what it means to be college-ready, implement those college-ready standards in high school, fund remedial education programs in ways that reward student success, and customize coursework to meet students’ needs. With a dynamic high school population and more than 42 million Americans between the ages of 18 and 64 earning below a livable wage and in need of basic skills support, these are myths our nation can no longer afford.
Call for a rewrite.  Let's take "implement those college-ready standards in high school" seriously.  Does it not follow that students who meet college-ready standards out of high school will require less, or no remediation?  The solution, then, is more likely to be an end to social promotion, in order that eleventh-grade classes aren't being conducted at a seventh-grade level.  Then consider that "42 million Americans between the ages of 18 and 64 earning below a livable wage and in need of basic skills support".  Sounds like a call to introduce the habits of the middle class into kindergarten and elementary school, the way things used to be.

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