28.9.18

PERMISSIBLE PREJUDICES.

I Went to High School With Boys Just Like Him.
My very good education was accompanied everything standard of a wealthy, religious environment: abstinence speakers, anti-choice lectures, morality policing, skirt measuring, a disproportionate volume of white students, a parking lot full of cars no teenager should be driving and a football culture to rival Varsity Blues. It set the stage for a privileged group to evade accountability for consistent incendiary behavior.  And the message from the administration was clear: ladies keep your skirts long and your legs closed because men cannot be held accountable for their behavior. After all men are supposed to behave that way.

A group of future Ivy League fraternity brothers dominated our school culture with plenty of resources and no rules. They could find their way out of almost any trouble that a drunken Friday night post-football game party would offer up.  I remember being at a house party where when any female would walk into the room, a group of male students would circle and chant “show your tits!”. If one of my female friends was outed as having a sexual experience with a male peer she was deemed a slut and verbally smeared by the men who grew up under fathers that didn’t want their boys lives to be ruined by “5 minutes of action”.
That gives the columnist license to generalize from her own experience?  Thought experiment: substitute any other ascriptive category for that "future Ivy League fraternity brothers" and contemplate the consequences of going public with it.

2 comments:

Dave Tufte said...

You didn't say it so I will. It is socially acceptable in some circles to be bigoted against the affluent and influential. And it is socially acceptable in those circles to not countenance that this might even be bigotry.

FWIW: I went to a public high school that fit that mold, and I was conditioned to view many people in just the way described.

Stephen Karlson said...

Yes, and there's probably something in Barrington Moore, or perhaps Rosseau Himself, justifying such anger as Good and Proper.